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December 02, 2011

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Kim

The big kick I'm on now is trying to buy US cotton woven in US mills. I do so like all the different fabrics that so many fabric designers are creating these days, but they tend to be shipped into the US from somewhere else. So I use those sparingly and use the US stuff generously.

j. caroline

Kim,
I bet that isn't easy, because I think most cotton gets exported and milled overseas. I think you are more likely to find fabric being printed (converted) in the US that has been milled elsewhere. But I find it difficult to get any of that information- most manufacturers just tell you where it is printed.

Martiel Beatty

Thanks for sharing this information. I have a client who buys from me on a regular basis and always requests cotton. I try to use what I can from reclaimed sources such as former sweaters and the like but otherwise I always try to go organic. However, I then run into the same issue you expressed above of only getting the print location. Cotton isn't heavily requested, but for my vegan clients, it's almost absolute - do you have ideas/suggestions for reputable yarn sources in the US?

Allkind Joinery

Great information. I actually don't know about how cotton flower blooms but recently I visited in my grandma's town, I saw then a Cotton tress but I actually don't saw the cotton flower. By the way thanks for sharing the facts about cottons, now I know about it.

Thanks!

Frannyo

You're in Houston, right? My company is surrounded by large cotton fields in East Bernard, just south of Richmond/Rosenberg/Sugarland. I like to hang out at the local Czech bbq place and chit-chat with the farmers. Some of them said that they too, would like to go organic and sell locally, but cotton is VERY pesticide intensive and our friend Monstanto has a lock on the seeds. They're kind-of trapped by the system, just like consumers.

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